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Oil reaches for a Benjamin

January 03 2008 | Jim's Blog,
by Jim

It's the first week of 2008 and welcome to it.

To frame our global situation we don't have to look beyond the fact that oil popped past $100 a barrel for the first time ever.

There are lots of angles into this fact, a plethora of statements to be made and arguments galore.

I simply want to make the case that this is a natural resources issue. This story is, literally, about a natural resource.

I look forward to the day that all of us, all users of natural resources... do one thing when we're buying gas, plastics or other petroleum products.

Think.

I don't mean to be snide, holier-than-thou or arrogant. I simply mean that we should all... think.

Today when we buy a drink from Starbucks (with a plastic lid or cup) my hypothesis is that we think "
$3 is a lot for a Latte... wait, I'm late to pick up the kids."... and I'm suggesting that we add-in an understanding that not only are we paying a lot for a coffee, a hem... a Latte... but that plastic (oil) is running out, the largest pollutant in our oceans, fueling wars, etc.

I want us to acknowledge that the plastic lid is probably going to be around... forever.

Today when we fill our vehicles we think "
wow, this is a seriously expensive tank of gas" and I'm suggesting we extend that thinking to include some level of aggregating trips to decrease our usage.

This is about stewardship of a natural resource, understanding ocean pollution trends and embracing the total costs as much as it is about a financial milestone.

No, this isn't rocket science. Yes, oil topped $100 a barrel.

What does that mean to you?

I know it's preachy to tell people to think about their habits and suggest they alter them to some way that aligns with my personal beliefs (and suggest I'm somehow living this perfect, low-oil consumption existence... which I'm not, I struggle with these same things). Call it that, call it anything you want. I'm simply suggesting we adopt a long-view perspective.

Think about your legacy.

Welcome to 2008.
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